Bee Morse Farm

Learning to live a little more country

Herb of the Week: Scullcap

on January 25, 2015

Scullcap

Scientific Name: Scutellaria Lateriflora

Part Used: Flowers and Leaves.  Psst…..it’s a member of the mint family!

Therapeutic Actions: antibacterial, antispasmodic, antiallergenic, cooling, diuretic, promotes bile flow, strongly anti-inflammatory, sedative.  This herb is extremely helpful for treating the nervous system: reduces pain, eases tension, feeds, tones, rehabilitates and strengths the nervous system, helps promote sleep and can even help to gently soothe and nourish the peripheral nerves and muscle tissue.

Medicinal Uses:  It’s really great to use for headaches, nerve tremors, stress, menstrual tension, insomnia and nervous exhaustion.

Recipe: Headache and Nervous Stress Tea:

2 parts Scullcap, 2 parts Lemonbalm, 1/2 part Feverfew and 4 parts Chamomile.  Do NOT boil this herb as it is super sensitive to heat. Add your tea mixture to pre-boiled water.  Steep for 20 minutes. Drink 1/4th cup every 30 minutes until symptoms have disappeared. Can be consumed hot or cold. It can also be reheated.

Adverse Reactions:   The Scutellaria Lateriflora herb is a strong, effective herb but traditionally there are no danger of overdosing if used over a prolonged period of time. Recently there has been some concern about scullcap and it’s potential for liver toxicity.  However, it has been found that germander that is frequently sold as scullcap is the culprit behind this new concern.  Be sure you are getting genuine, PURE Scutellaria Lateriflora.  Scullcap is NOT to be used when pregnant.

Toxicity: ———-

Drug Interactions: can increase the effect of drugs that have a sedating effect, including: Anticonvulsants such as phenytoin (Dilantin) and valproic acid (Depakote), Barbiturates, Benzodiazepines such as alprazolam (Xanax) and diazepam (Valium), Drugs to treat insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien), zaleplon (Sonata), eszopiclone (Lunesta), and ramelteon (Rozerem), Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), Alcohol.

 

********WARNING: The following information is provided to you for a more natural approach to common, everyday ailments.  This information should not replace your primary care physician and as with starting any new medication regiment, please discuss with your doctor.   It is always safest to perform a skin patch test prior to implementing new remedies to be sure you are not allergic. This information is not imparted  to determine dietary changes, provide course of treatment, prescribe as medication or diagnose any diseases/syndromes/conditions/disorders.  Please carefully research new recipes and ideas before implementing. ********


One Response to “Herb of the Week: Scullcap”

  1. I’ve never heard of scullcap before and loved learning about it :) Thank you!

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