Bee Morse Farm

Learning to live a little more country

Essential Oil Profile : Bergamot

3503Scientific Name: Citrus bergamia

Therapeutic Actions: analgesic, antidepressant, antiseptic, antibiotic, anti-spasmodic, stomachic, calmative, cicatrisant, deodorant, digestive, febrifuge, vermifuge and vulnerary

Part Used: The rind of both ripe and unripe fruit is used to extract the oil by expression

History: Although a native of tropical Asia, Bergamot is now extensively cultivated in the southern part of Italy where the Italians have used it in folk medicine for years, particularly for fevers. The name is derived from the city Bergamo in Lombardy, Italy, where the oil was first sold. Bergamot is one of the most widely used oils in the perfumery and toiletry industry and it is even used to flavor Earl Grey tea.

Contraindications: Bergamot essential oil is phototoxic, meaning when used topically and exposed to the sun, skin is more sensitive and potentially burn. Phototoxicity is due to the high content of bergaptene. When using bergamot essential oil topically do not expose that area to sunlight for 12-14 hours after application.

Compounds: Bergamot is composed of various chemical constituents and includes a-pinene, myrcene, limonene, a-bergaptene, b-bisabolene, linalool, linalyl acetate, nerol, neryl acetate, geraniol, geraniol acetate and a-terpineol.

Pharmacology: Bergamot oil can be used in the treatment of depression, anxiety or fear; stress and tension; infections including acne, abscesses and boils; skin conditions such as psoriasis, eczema and just plain itchy skin; loss of appetite and anorexia; helps combat oily skin and can reduce halitosis.

Drug Interactions: For those taking pharmaceuticals that already cause photosensitivity please use extreme caution when using bergamot topically. These drugs include (but are not limited to) Elavil, Cipro, Noroxin, Maxaquin, Floxin, Levaquin, Zagam, Tequin, Avelox, Septra, Trisoralen.

Additional Information: Bergamot might lower blood sugar levels. This could affect blood sugar control for individuals with diabetes. Please take care to monitor your blood sugar closely if taking bergamot internally.

Blends Well With: bergamot oil goes particularly well with black pepper, clary sage, cypress, frankincense, geranium, jasmine, mandarin, nutmeg, orange, rosemary, sandalwood, vetiver and ylang-ylang.

 

 

********WARNING: The following information is provided to you for a more natural approach to common, everyday ailments.  This information should not replace your primary care physician and as with starting any new medication regiment, please discuss with your doctor.   It is always safest to perform a skin patch test prior to implementing new remedies to be sure you are not allergic. This information is not imparted  to determine dietary changes, provide course of treatment, prescribe as medication or diagnose any diseases/syndromes/conditions/disorders.  Please carefully research new recipes and ideas before implementing. ********

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Essential Oil Profile: Clary Sage

clary sage

 

Scientific Name: Salvia sclarea

Therapeutic Actions: antidepressant, antispasmodic, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, deodorant, digestive, emmenagogue, hypotensive, nervine, sedative & stomachic.

History: The name “clary” is derived from the Latin word “clarus” meaning clear.  Medieval authors called the herb “clear eye” and considered it beneficial in healing visual problems.  It was known in the Middle Ages as “Oculus Christi”, meaning the eye of Christ, and was a highly esteemed medicine.  In German clary sage was known as “muscatel sage” because it resembled muscatel wine.  Dishonest merchants would adulterate their muscatel wine with clary sage.  This often produced a heightened state of intoxication.  In sixteenth century England, clary sage was substituted for hops in their production of beer.

Parts of the Plant: Clary sage oil is extracted by steam distillation from the flowering tops and leaves.

Composition: Clary sage contains linalyl acetate, linalool, germacrene d and sclareo, which makes it about 75% ester.

Pharmacological Actions: Clary sage is calming to the nervous system, particularly in cases of depression, stress, insomnia and deep seated tension.  It is a good tonic for the womb and female functions in general such as painful periods, scanty menstruation and relaxation during labor, thus encouraging a less painful birth.  During menopause, clary sage can help reduce hot flashes, night sweats, palpitations, irritability as well as headaches and dizziness.  It is good for muscle pains, digestive disorders, kidney diseases and the cooling of inflammation of the skin.

Indications (it is good for):  Clary sage has been effectively used for leukemia, menstrual discomforts including PMS, hormonal imbalance, insomnia, circulatory issues and high cholesterol.

Contraindications (it is not good for): Clary sage is contraindicated during the first trimester of pregnancy.  It is generally a safe and non toxic oil but many have some possibilities of irritating mucous membranes.  Remember to read the scientific name when purchasing clary sage! Salvia officials (or common sage) as an essential oil is not recommended due to the high content of thujone which can be toxic.

Interactions: Clary sage should be avoided when consuming alcohol or other drugs (recreational or pharmaceutical) since it could exaggerate the effects.

Dosage: Use clary sage essential oils in bath or in aromatherapy blends.  Clary sage is warming and very relaxing.  Use it to treat oily hair and skin, dandruff and facial wrinkles.  For relief of hot flashes in menopause or to quickly cool summer prickly heat, take a sponge bath with a few drops of clary sage in cool water.  When diffused this oil is great for helping induce sleep.

 

 

********WARNING: The following information is provided to you for a more natural approach to common, everyday ailments.  This information should not replace your primary care physician and as with starting any new medication regiment, please discuss with your doctor.   It is always safest to perform a skin patch test prior to implementing new remedies to be sure you are not allergic. This information is not imparted  to determine dietary changes, provide course of treatment, prescribe as medication or diagnose any diseases/syndromes/conditions/disorders.  Please carefully research new recipes and ideas before implementing. ********

 

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Definition for a Holistic Lifestyle

If your new to the holistic world than most likely you’ve encountered some definitions that have you scratching your head.  Below are a few definitions that will help you untangle the web of confusion.

(This list is a work in progress.  If you have a definition suggestion please comment below.)

 

Allopathic – conventional medicine; today’s mainstream medical practice; using pharmacological drugs that treat ailments, diseases or illnesses. Allopathic medicine classifies illness solely by naming symptoms into a disease pattern.

Alternative Medicine – Holistic health, natural medicine, alternative medicine: these definitions are interchangeable. These fields group together a wide and varied field.  It includes (but is not limited to) homeopathy, herbalism, aromatherapy, nutrition, acupuncture, Ayurveda, energy therapy and color therapy just to name a few. Regardless of the type of therapy they all share an underlying common theme, PREVENTION. To utilize alternative effectively we rely on health history, personal tendencies (allergies, dietary issues, etc) and symptomology (process of identifying an illness or symptom) to get a wider picture of the situation.

Antioxidants – Antioxidants are chemicals that block the activity of free radicals. Free radicals are chemicals that have a HUGE potential to deteriorate our cells, causing damage that could potentially lead to cancer. Free radicals are naturally occurring in the body. Antioxidants are also important to detoxing our bodies.

Aromatherapy – the use of natural oils that have a pleasant smell to make a person feel better. Check out my previous blog post for a more in-depth definition.

Detoxification – okay, most people know what detoxing is but we’ll include it in the list of definitions. Detoxification is the removal of toxic substances from a living organism. The liver plays the most important role of detoxing but the kidney’s also help.  Detoxing your body is a key factor in natural health.

Essential Oils – check out my previous blog post for a more in-depth definition. Essential oils, used properly, have many advantages over modern day drugs. Today’s medicine usually only contain 2-4 chemical compounds verses essential oils can have dozens and dozens of these compounds, which is what provides the healing benefits.

Herbalism/Herbalist – The study or practice of the medicinal and therapeutic use of plants, now especially as a form of alternative medicine. Check out my previous blog post for a more in-depth definition

Holistic Health – Holistic health, natural medicine, alternative medicine: these definitions are interchangeable. These fields group together a wide and varied field.  It includes (but is not limited to) homeopathy, herbalism, aromatherapy, nutrition, acupuncture, Ayurveda, energy therapy and color therapy just to name a few. Regardless of the type of therapy they all share an underlying common theme, PREVENTION. To utilize holistic health effectively we rely on health history, personal tendencies (allergies, dietary issues, etc) and symptomology (process of identifying an illness or symptom) to get a wider picture of the situation.

Homeopathic – a principal that thought is “like cures like”; homeopathic medicine give a very diluted dose of remedy that, given in larger doses, would create similar symptoms of those that are being treated. A vaccine is the perfect example of a homeopathic remedy. In some of the vaccines we receive here in the USA, a VERY diluted amount of the virus that we are trying to prevent is injected into us.  Although the vaccine is a great example of what homeopathic medicine is, it is not considered homeopathic in the medical field.

Homeostatis – The bodily systems work in unison and as they were intended to. It is a process that maintains the stability of the human body’s internal environment in response to changes in external conditions.

Natural Medicine – Holistic health, natural medicine, alternative medicine: these definitions are interchangeable. These fields group together a wide and varied field.  It includes (but is not limited to) homeopathy, herbalism, aromatherapy, nutrition, acupuncture, Ayurveda, energy therapy and color therapy just to name a few. Regardless of the type of therapy they all share an underlying common theme, PREVENTION. To utilize natural medicine effectively we rely on health history, personal tendencies (allergies, dietary issues, etc) and symptomology (process of identifying an illness or symptom) to get a wider picture of the situation.

Nutrition – Okay, everybody knows what nutrition is so I won’t necessarily define it.  However, nutrition plays a VERY, VERY important role in holistic health. We’ve all heard the term “you are what you eat“. I could go on forrrrrr-evvvvver about nutrition, so I’ll just leave it as this: the biggest key in prevention is what you eat for food. I’ll be covering this topic more in-depth at a later date.

Pharmaceuticals – This is another definition that we all know: they are our modern day drugs. While pharmaceuticals were once derived from the chemical compositions of herbs, today theses compounds are more than like synthetic and made in a lab somewhere (most likely not even in America). When using herbal remedies, you receive HUNDREDS of chemical compounds that focus on whatever issue your treating. Now why would you use a modern day drug is you could use a herbal remedy :)

Terrain Theory– the terrain is the internal fluids of  your body. This includes blood, plasma, lymphatic fluid and all other bodily fluids. The milieu interieur, or internal environment, was coined by a French physiologist and he theorized that if the terrain is healthy (such as proper pH level, low number of toxins, etc) all organs of the body can work together in unison, efficiently fighting off foreign invaders such as disease or illnesses. Keeping the terrain healthy is integral in holistic healing.

 

 

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Essential Oil Profile: Wintergreen

wintergreen2

Scientific Name: Gaultheria Procumbens

Therapeutic Actions: analgesic, anodyne, anti-rheumatic, anti-arthritic, antispasmodic, antiseptic, aromatic, astringent, carminative, diuretic, emenagogue and stimulant

Part Used: Steam distillation of its leaves

History: Wintergreen is a tree native to North America and it is believed to have been Native Americans who discovered the use of its oil to eliminate pain in the muscles & joints and to treat for rheumatism, fever, headaches and sore throats. Wintergreen was also chewed to help increase lung capacity and assist in healing respiratory conditions. Early settlers chewed on wintergreen to help prevent tooth decay. A tea made from the leaves of the wintergreen plant was used as a substitute for tea during the Revolutionary War.

Contraindications: Oral or topical application is best avoided in children. Avoid use in patients with known hypersensitivity to any of the components in wintergreen oil. Avoid use in patients with asthma, known salicylate allergy, or G.I. irritation or inflammation.

Compounds: Menthyl Salicylate and Gaultherilene are the two main components of this essential oil.

Pharmacology: Menthyl Salicylate forms an integral part of almost every antiarthritic and analgesic balm for muscle and joint pain that is available on the market today. Wintergreen is extremely popular with the people suffering from rheumatism, arthritis, gout and pain in their bones and joints from any number of reasons.

LD50: The acute oral LD50 in a rat is 1.3mL. However, in humans methyl salicylate does appear to be more
toxic. Given the numbers of fatalities in years past, with the amount ingested being known in a number of cases, we can estimate a human LD50 of 0.3g For a 132 pound adult, this would translate to the ingestion of about 19mL, or 380 drops of wintergreen essential oil. Keep in mind that 1 teaspoon (5 mL) of wintergreen oil is equivalent to approximately 7000 mg of salicylate or 21.5 adult aspirin tablets.

Side Effects: Taken in large amounts can cause ringing in the ears, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, stomach pain, confusion and even death.

Drug Interactions: Taking wintergreen oil along with warfarin (Coumadin) can increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Do not mix the drug with wintergreen oil without your doctor’s permission. Also, using large amounts of wintergreen oil on your skin and taking aspirin at the same time might increase the risk of side effects.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children – Wintergreen leaf and oil can be poisonous for children. Taking 4-10 mL of wintergreen oil by mouth can be deadly. Don’t even use wintergreen oil on the skin of children less than 2 years old.

Pregnancy/Breast-Feeding – Wintergreen is safe in amounts found in food, but there’s not enough information to know if it’s safe in the larger amounts that are used as medicine. Don’t take it by mouth or put it on your skin, if you are
pregnant. If you are breast-feeding, don’t take wintergreen by mouth or put it on your skin. Wintergreen products might be toxic to nursing
infants.

Stomach & Intestinal Inflammation – Taking wintergreen by mouth might make these conditions worse.

Aspirin/Salicylate Allergy – Wintergreen might cause an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to salicylate compounds, or have asthma or nasal polyps. Use wintergreen with extreme caution if you have one of these conditions.

Additional Information: This essential oil can be poisonous due to the presence of Menthyl Salicylate. It should never be ingested and should not be used for undiluted inhalation. If large amounts of wintergreen are ingested, it can cause severe damage to internal organs like the liver and kidneys. Transdermal application is sufficient for making this oil work internally. One more cautionary note, excessive application on the skin can cause severe skin rashes, burns or open wounds.

 

 

********WARNING: The following information is provided to you for a more natural approach to common, everyday ailments.  This information should not replace your primary care physician and as with starting any new medication regiment, please discuss with your doctor.   It is always safest to perform a skin patch test prior to implementing new remedies to be sure you are not allergic. This information is not imparted  to determine dietary changes, provide course of treatment, prescribe as medication or diagnose any diseases/syndromes/conditions/disorders.  Please carefully research new recipes and ideas before implementing. ********

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It’s giveaway day!

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We’ve hit 300+ likes on Facebook and we are celebrating by giving away a 15 mL bottle of Young Living’s Purification essential oil.

Head over to our Facebook page to enter!

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Herb of the Week: Scullcap

Scullcap

Scientific Name: Scutellaria Lateriflora

Part Used: Flowers and Leaves.  Psst…..it’s a member of the mint family!

Therapeutic Actions: antibacterial, antispasmodic, antiallergenic, cooling, diuretic, promotes bile flow, strongly anti-inflammatory, sedative.  This herb is extremely helpful for treating the nervous system: reduces pain, eases tension, feeds, tones, rehabilitates and strengths the nervous system, helps promote sleep and can even help to gently soothe and nourish the peripheral nerves and muscle tissue.

Medicinal Uses:  It’s really great to use for headaches, nerve tremors, stress, menstrual tension, insomnia and nervous exhaustion.

Recipe: Headache and Nervous Stress Tea:

2 parts Scullcap, 2 parts Lemonbalm, 1/2 part Feverfew and 4 parts Chamomile.  Do NOT boil this herb as it is super sensitive to heat. Add your tea mixture to pre-boiled water.  Steep for 20 minutes. Drink 1/4th cup every 30 minutes until symptoms have disappeared. Can be consumed hot or cold. It can also be reheated.

Adverse Reactions:   The Scutellaria Lateriflora herb is a strong, effective herb but traditionally there are no danger of overdosing if used over a prolonged period of time. Recently there has been some concern about scullcap and it’s potential for liver toxicity.  However, it has been found that germander that is frequently sold as scullcap is the culprit behind this new concern.  Be sure you are getting genuine, PURE Scutellaria Lateriflora.  Scullcap is NOT to be used when pregnant.

Toxicity: ———-

Drug Interactions: can increase the effect of drugs that have a sedating effect, including: Anticonvulsants such as phenytoin (Dilantin) and valproic acid (Depakote), Barbiturates, Benzodiazepines such as alprazolam (Xanax) and diazepam (Valium), Drugs to treat insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien), zaleplon (Sonata), eszopiclone (Lunesta), and ramelteon (Rozerem), Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil), Alcohol.

 

********WARNING: The following information is provided to you for a more natural approach to common, everyday ailments.  This information should not replace your primary care physician and as with starting any new medication regiment, please discuss with your doctor.   It is always safest to perform a skin patch test prior to implementing new remedies to be sure you are not allergic. This information is not imparted  to determine dietary changes, provide course of treatment, prescribe as medication or diagnose any diseases/syndromes/conditions/disorders.  Please carefully research new recipes and ideas before implementing. ********

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Keeping Winter Skin Nourished

I don’t know about you, but this time of year is brutal to my skin.  It’s a constant battle to be free of dry, flaky winter time skin. So how can we have smooth, summer time skin year round?

Hydrate

You’ve heard me say it before, your skin is your largest organ. Here’s a new tip: your skin is the last organ to receive water.  So skin is: the largest organ and the last to get water.  Don’t have a clue as to how much water you should be drinking? Here’s a quick calculation – divide your weight by half (150/2=75).  Instead of saying 75 pounds we are going to change pounds to ounces (75 ounces).  And that is how much water you should be targeting for daily intake.  For a typical person this is a great calculation but remember there are variables that could change this formula such as exercise, health issues, etc.

 

Body Brushing

IMG_3975check out my adorable rubber ducky body brush

Have you ever heard of body brushing? Take a soft bristled brush and vigorously rub your body with it.  This helps exfoliate the body, eliminating dead skin cells, hair and other gobbly gook.  By exfoliating the dead stuff away your skin has better breathability. Body brushing also increases circulation, may help reduce cellulite, may improve the lymphatic system (hello detoxification!) and invigorates your body. Get a body brush here!

 

Epsom Salt Baths

Epsom salts are not actually salt, but a naturally occurring pure mineral compound of sulfates and magnesium.  Magnesium plays a host of roles including regulating enzymes, reduces inflammation, soothes muscles and promotes sleep. Sulfates help improve the absorption of nutrients, flush toxins and help ease migraine headaches.

By bathing in Epsom salts, not only will it easy sore muscles and help you get sleepy but it will draw moisture to the top of your skin.

Want to skip the bath but still get the benefits of Epsom salts? Pick up some of our salt scrubs from the Bee Morse Farm store for the same magnesium and sulfate benefits.

 

Skip the Hot Water

I know a piping hot shower is the most tempting way to warm up during the winter but it’s also one of the easiest way to get dry skin.  Hot water strips the natural oils, called sebum (learn more here), from your skin faster than you can say zip-a-dee-doo-dah.

 

Only Use Soap When Necessary

Say WHAT?!?!?! Don’t get me wrong, I am not telling you to stop using soap altogether. But unless you NEED to lather up (ie. sweaty gym body), only wash necessary parts as soap is another of those natural oil strippers. I am a secretary by day and calm, relaxing yoga is my go to exercise so I don’t really get sweaty or have clumps of dirt clinging to me after a day at work in the winter so I don’t wash my arms, belly, back or legs as frequently as I do during the summer time.   P.S. – I do wash stinky creases everyday though (elbows, armpits, knees, etc).

 

 Say Yes to Air Drying

Don’t reach for your towel after a shower! By vigorously rubbing the water off your skin post shower you are not only rubbing off water that should be absorbed but you are disturbing your sebum, which help provide moisture to the surface of your skin. Instead of drying off, apply a body butter (get some here) to your wet skin, which will help seal that moisture in.

 

Darn! I Already Dried Off

If you forgot and dried off, or your body is still extra dry half way through the day, squirt a quarter size drop of lotion in your palm, quickly run your hand under a running facet and apply to body. By adding water to your lotion, the water will help pull it into your skin.  Remember, what you put onto your skin is pulled through and enters your bloodstream.  I bet if you sweet talked Kathryn at Took A Leap Farm she would mail you some of their all natural goats milk lotion. It’s my absolute favorite!

 

By incorporating these little tips into your daily routine you can have soft, summer skin even in the dead of winter.

 

What’s your favorite way to keep skin nourished during the winter?

 

 

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Herb of the Week: Peppermint

ECC-Hrb-PeppermintPeppermint is my VERY all time favorite herb.  I’m a total peppermint addict!

Scientific Name: M. Piperita

Part Used: Leaves

Therapeutic Actions: analgesic, anesthetic, antiseptic, antigalactogogue, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant, emenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine, stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor and vermifuge

Medicinal Uses:  Terrific for soothing nausea. Peppermint is commonly used for pain relief treatments, induces numbness, reduce milk flow (pregnant ladies, don’t even drink peppermint tea after 8 months of gestation if you plan on breastfeeding), relaxes muscle spasms, helps aid in removing gas, good for brain & memory health,  promotes bile discharge, helps clear congestion and ease respiratory problems. Furthermore, peppermint essential oil relieves menstruation cramps, expels phlegm, reduces fever, is a good tonic for the liver, nerves, and stomach.  Promotes perspiration.

Recipe: By applying a paste of peppermint leaves or using diluted peppermint oil topically you can help speed recovery of a sun burn.

Adverse Reactions: Peppermint oil disturbs certain liver detoxification systems, therefore it can interfere with the metabolism of certain drugs. By inhalation, menthol dilates nasal capillaries and can overexcite the CNS, possibly leading to cardiac fibrillation.  Large amounts of menthol taken orally are hepatotoxic, which means it can toxicially damage the liver.  menthol dilates nasal capillaries via inhalation and can overexcite the central nervous system, possibly leading to cardiac fibrillation.

Toxicity: LD50 of Peppermint essential oil is >2 grams or 2 mL’s in the test population.   MSDS sheet can be downloaded here

Contraindications: contraindicated with the use of cardiac stabilizing medications.  Studies have shown peppermint essential oil can  interfere with calcium channel blockers.

Drug Interactions: Peppermint oil might decrease how quickly the body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune).  As previously mentioned,  peppermint oil can disrupt the liver detox system. Some medications that can be effected by a disrupted liver include Elavil, Haldol, Zofran, Inderal, Theo-Dur, Calan, Isoptin, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix, Valium, Soma, Viracept, Motrin, Coumadin and others. This doesn’t mean those taking these medications can’t use peppermint, but before use please consult your healthcare professionals.

Note: Peppermint, as with any of the mint family, is considered invasive.  To grow mint in a garden, plant in a container to keep roots from getting out of hand.

Head on over to the SHOP for items that include peppermint.

********WARNING: The following information is provided to you for a more natural approach to common, everyday ailments.  This information should not replace your primary care physician and as with starting any new medication regiment, please discuss with your doctor.   It is always safest to perform a skin patch test prior to implementing new remedies to be sure you are not allergic. This information is not imparted  to determine dietary changes, provide course of treatment, prescribe as medication or diagnose any diseases/syndromes/conditions/disorders.  Please carefully research new recipes and ideas before implementing. ********

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This journey I am on…….

A bit over 2 and a half years ago my husband and I purchased our little patch of heaven,  42 acres of wooded bliss.  It has a a river that runs the entire back border of the property, a 3 acre field, almost smack dab in the middle of the acreage and our dream house will be about 1000 feet from the main road, tucked in the woods.  We have so much wildlife out there: bunnies hop to and fro, ruffled grouse can be heard drumming (seriously, the first time I heard it I thought someone was trying to start a dead tractor…..a little city girl don’tcha think?), white tailed deer and we’ve spied fox, coyotes, bears and moose on our trail cameras. In the spring time, as soon as we hit the driveway, the truck windows get rolled down and it’s radio silence so we can hear the birds chirping and singing, darting through the forest, flitting from branch to branch.  If you stand still enough, and breathe deeply enough, you can hear the brook bubbling in the background.

In the summer months you can hear the chubby, clumsy bumblebees buzzing from flower to flower, watch the honeybees land on their hives, their baskets full of pollen.  You can hear the rooster crow from just down the road and smell the clover growing in our field. It’s amazing and captivating and enchanting and extraordinary.  The very first time I stepped foot on that property, it filled this hole I had in my soul.  A hole I didn’t even know existed. This little piece of earth filled me with peace. THIS is where I am supposed to be.

And the dreams began……I dream of a little red barn, nestled in the corner of the field, walking out to it in the early morning light.  The mist hanging heavy in the air, smelling of fresh hay (and probably manure, ha!), hearing the sheep baa-ing and the mini cow (yes their real!) moo-ing and the chickens clucking.  I dream of a pond big enough for the boys to splash the hot summer days away or do a little fishing in. Of hearing big ole bullfrogs and crickets serenading us to sleep. I dream of white picket fences and flowers galore. Of porch rocking chairs and tall glasses of ice cold lemonade sparkling in the summer sun.  Of long winter months snuggled around the fire, knitting in my hands, with fiber from my very own sheep (but of course). I dream of this beautiful garden that will bless us with the best kind of nourishment and meat grown and harvested right from our very own land.

Just 3 years ago I didn’t really have a life dream. I can’t say that I was wandering through life aimlessly, but I didn’t really have a particular direction on where to go.  It seems this property has unlocked that for me.  In the last 2 years I have become a Master Gardener, a herbalist in training, a Farmers Market vendor and now I’m jumping on the whole food advocate train.  I’m growing more conscious of what I put in my body, not just food but other environmentals too. I’m learning about what toxins are entering my body, where they are coming from, if they are leaving my body and how can I help them get out.  It’s amazing to learn what our modern day environment is doing to us.

Are you interested in learning more about this?

Have you started this journey yet?

What is the best thing you’ve done to rid your body of chemicals?

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Salves and Balms

Available but not photographed

booty balm Booty Balm

diaper rash salve

organic plantain, organic chickweed, organic st. john’s wort,organic calendula, organic golden seal root, olive oil & beeswax

$5

2 oz. tin

plantain – anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory.  Helps relieve pain and itchiness caused by wounds or rashes.

chickweed – helps relieve itchiness, especially due to eczema & psoriasis. Helps heal wounds, cuts, burns or abscesses

st. john’s wort – eases muscle spasms – anti-inflammatory. Helps relieve feelings of tension and anxiety

calendula – wonderful remedy for skin wounds or rashes, perfect for healing diaper rashes, dry skin or cradle cap – anti inflammatory.

golden seal root – another wonderful remedy for skin wound it helps treat rashes, itching, eczema,  acne, dandruff and cold sores – anti-microbial

 

 

Burn Relief

helps relief pain from burns and promotes healing

organic plantain, organic lavender, organic peppermint, organic comfrey,organic raw coconut oil, organic almond oil, olive oil, beeswax plus essential oils

$5

2 oz. tin

plantain – anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory.  Helps relieve pain and itchiness caused by wounds or rashes.

lavender – notorious for it’s healing ability that is specific to burns.  Promotes rapid healing and pain relief

peppermint –   It’s stimulating effect increases blood circulation, oxygenating organs, boost your metabolism and helps stop pain.

comfrey –  externally: helps ease excessive bleeding, reduces pain

Wound Care

organic thyme, organic plantain, organic peppermint, organic calendula, organic raw coconut oil, organic sweet almond oil, olive oil, beeswax and essential oils

$5

2 oz tin

thyme – great anti-septic properties, stops infections from forming.

plantain – anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory.  Helps relieve pain and itchiness caused by wounds or rashes.

peppermint –   It’s stimulating effect increases blood circulation, oxygenating organs, boost your metabolism and helps stop pain.

calendula – wonderful remedy for skin wounds or rashes,  one of the best herbal anti-inflammatory’s, relieving swelling and redness.

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